Nimble Boys Make Good Food

The origin and history of the word chopsticks is as follows:  1699, sailors’ partial translation of Chinese k’wai tse “fast ones” or “nimble boys,” first element from pidgin Eng. chop, from Cantonese kap “urgent.” Chopsticks, the two-fingered piano exercise, is first attested 1893, probably from the resemblance of the fingers to chopsticks (source: Dictionary.com)
 
This explanation is quite apropos for one of my favorite restaurants in town that bears the namesake: Chopstix Too.  This little Kearney Mesa-based Japanese eatery is the most nimble restaurant I’ve ever seen.  It is an amazingly streamlined operation.  The second you walk through the door you are given the most prompt service you’ve ever seen and it never stops until you leave.
 
You can literally have a sit-down lunch in less than 30 minutes at Chopstix Too.  They also offer take-out.  The restaurant gets packed around noon, so it is best to go around 11:30 or after 1 if you are in a huge rush.  Even if you get caught in the lunch traffic, it won’t be a long wait – these people are expert table turners.  The same menu is offered at dinner time and the restaurant tends to be less crowded. 
 
Chopstix Too Lunch SpecialThat, coupled with incredibly low prices, makes it a winner in my book.  Their combination specials average around $5 each and come with a full plate of food, plus miso soup.  I always get the edamame, chicken salad and roll combo.  Today it was a spicy tuna roll.  The food is always very good – no matter what I order to eat.   
 
 
 
 
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